Selecting a HealthMeasure

  • Intended use of the data:
    • Measures used for screening multiple symptoms or conditions need to be brief to reduce respondent burden. However, short measures are typically less precise than longer measures unless computer adaptive tests (CATs) are used.
    • Measures used to diagnose a condition, or risk for condition, (e.g., depression), should be longer to ensure the condition is measured reliably. Longer questionnaires or CAT–based assessment are a good options.
    • Measures that monitor a person’s health over time require more precision than screening measures. This will allow a clinician to evaluate how the patient’s health is changing based on the nature of the disease or treatment initiation. CAT-based assessments are good options as they can accurately capture change over time.
    • Measures can be used as an indicator of quality of healthcare. Measures of the performance of healthcare providers or healthcare delivery organizations are being designed to evaluate change in health status over time in individuals (e.g., pre- to post-hip surgery physical functioning). Longer questionnaires (or CAT) are recommended.
  • Patient population:
    • The health condition or disease of the population will inform the type of outcomes that need to be assessed. For example, physical functioning is critical for arthritis patients and the impact of asthma is important for children with asthma.
    • As older populations may have multiple chronic conditions, PROMIS® profiles may be of interest as they capture a range of outcomes including physical functioning, pain severity, pain interference, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and ability to participate in social roles and activities.

Additional factors to consider:

  • Number of assessments: Frequent assessments provide a more complete picture of a person’s health over time but can be burdensome for patients (to complete) and clinicians (to review).
  • Timing of assessments:
    • Measures completed in the clinic should minimize the disruption to usual clinic workflow. This often means they need to be brief and collected at times when patients are already waiting.
    • Measures can be completed at a healthcare visit. This information is then available to the care provider. Alternately, measures can be completed between clinic visits. This allows more frequent assessment and less disruption to the workflow. However, it may not reflect how a person is doing on the day of a clinic visit and may require a process for providers to follow-up with people who are having problems or concerns.
  • Mode of data collection: Internet-linked devices can provide instant data summary and feedback but may pose barriers for patients with limited access to technology or a cost burden on a clinic for devices (e.g., tablet computers for use in a waiting room).
  • Reporting of data: Data should be presented in an understandable format. This format may be different for the person who completed the assessment than for the care provider. This could involve terminology (e.g., “dyspnea” versus “trouble breathing”).

If you are uncertain about which measure to choose, consider these recommended measures available through Search & View Measures:

  • NIH Toolbox® batteries for Cognition, Emotion, Motor, and Sensation
  • PROMIS Global Health (10 items measuring physical health and mental health)
  • PROMIS-57 (measures Physical Function, Fatigue, Pain Interference, Pain Intensity, Sleep Disturbance, Depression, Anxiety, and Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities)
  • Neuro-QoL short forms for neurological conditions
  • ASCQ-MeSM short forms for sickle cell disease

PROMIS includes multiple short forms for a given domain. Here are primary recommendations for the short form that is appropriate for most purposes. In some cases, a longer short form may provide a more precise score. In those cases, the longer short form (or secondary recommendations) should be used in place of the primary recommendation.

Adult Measures


Domain
Primary Recommendations Secondary Recommendations
Overall Health v1.2 Global Health v1.2 Global Health and v2.0 PROMIS-29 Profile
Anxiety v1.0 Anxiety 4a short form v1.0 Anxiety 8a short form
Cognitive Function v2.0 Cognitive Function 8a short form  
Depression v1.0 Depression 4a short form v1.0 Depression 8a short form
Psychosocial Illness Impact v1.0 Negative 4a short form
v1.0 Positive 4a short form
v1.0 Negative 8a short form
v1.0 Positive 8a short form
Alcohol v1.0 Alcohol Use 7a short form

v1.0 Alcohol Use 7a short form and any of the following:

v1.0 Negative Consequences 7a short form
v1.0 Positive Consequences 7a short form
v1.0 Negative Expectancies 7a short form
v1.0 Positive Expectancies 7a short form

Anger v1.1 Anger 5a short form  
Pain Intensity v1.0 Pain Intensity 3a short form  
Pain Behavior v1.0 Pain Behavior 7a short form  
Pain Interference v1.0 Pain Interference 6a short form  
Fatigue v1.0 Fatigue 7a short form v1.0 Fatigue 13a short form1
Physical Function v1.0 Physical Function 10a short form

v1.0 Physical Function 10a short form and

v2.0 Physical Function Upper Extremity short form2

Sleep v1.0 Sleep Disturbance 8a short form  
Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities v2.0 Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities 4a short form v2.0 Ability to Part Social Roles and Activities 8a short form
Satisfaction with Participation in Social Roles and Activities v2.0 Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities 4a short form v2.0 Satisfaction Social Roles and Activities 8a short form
Companionship v2.0 Companionship 4a short form v2.0 Companionship 6a short form
Emotional Support

v2.0 Emotional Support 4a short form

 

v2.0 Emotional Support 8a short form
Informational Support

v2.0 Informational Support 4a short form

 

v2.0 Informational Support 8a short form
Instrumental Support v2.0 Instrumental Support 4a short form v2.0 Instrumental Support 8a short form
Social Isolation v2.0 Social Isolation 4a short form v2.0 Social Isolation 8a short form
1This contains the same items as those in the FACIT Fatigue 13 and will be available in Fall 2016.
2Based on the v1.2 Upper Extremity item bank that includes 16 items. Short form will be available in Fall 2016.

Pediatric (Ped) Measures


Domain
Primary Recommendations Secondary Recommendations
Overall Health v1.0 Ped: Global 7+2 v1.0 Ped: Global 7+2 and v2.0 Ped: Profile 25
Anger v2.0 Ped: Anger 5a short form  
Anxiety v2.0 Ped: Anxiety 8a short form  
Depressive Symptoms v2.0 Ped: Depression 8a short form  
Asthma Impact v2.0 Ped: Asthma Impact 8a short form  
Fatigue v2.0 Ped: Fatigue 10a short form  
Mobility v2.0 Ped: Mobility 8a short form  
Pain Interference v2.0 Ped: Pain Interference 8a short form  
Upper Extremity v2.0 Ped: Upper Extremity 8a short form  
Peer Relations v2.0 Ped: Peer Relationships 8a short form  

Parent Proxy (PP) Measures


Domain
Primary Recommendations Secondary Recommendations
Overall Health v1.0 PP: Global 7+2 v1.1 PP: Global 7+2 and v2.0 PP: Profile 25
Anger v2.0 PP: Anger 5a short form  
Anxiety v2.1 PP: Anxiety 8a short form  
Depressive Symptoms v2.1 PP: Depressive Symptoms 6b short form  
Asthma Impact v2.0 PP: Asthma Impact 8a short form  
Fatigue v2.0 PP: Fatigue 10a short form  
Mobility v2.0 PP: Mobility 8a short form  
Pain Interference v2.0 PP: Pain Interference 8a short form  
Upper Extremity v2.0 PP: Upper Extremity 8a short form  
Peer Relations v2.0 PP: Peer Relationships 7a short form  

Last updated 4/18/2016