List of Adult Measures

Available PROMIS® Measures for Adults 

Adult Domains Definition

Bank/ Scale/ Pool

#items

Short Forms

#items

Global Health*

Overall evaluation of one's physical and mental health.

10  
Global Mental Overall evaluation of one's mental health. 2  
Global Physical Overall evaluation of one's physical health. 2  
Mental Health
Alcohol – Alcohol Use Drinking patterns, cue-based drinking, cravings to drink, and efforts to control drinking that indicate problematic drinking, particularly at the high end of the severity continuum. 37 7
Alcohol – Negative Consequences Negative personal outcomes of alcohol use over the past 30 days. These items cover physical, mental, and social consequences of drinking. 31 7
Alcohol – Negative Expectancies General attitudes about negative outcomes of alcohol use. These items cover physical, mental, and social negative expectancies of drinking. 11 7
Alcohol – Positive Consequences Positive personal outcomes of alcohol use over the past 30 days. These items cover physical, mental, and social consequences of drinking. 20 7
Alcohol – Positive Expectancies General attitudes about positive outcomes of alcohol use. These items cover physical, mental, and social positive expectancies of drinking. 9 7
Cognitive Function Mental acuity, concentration, verbal and nonverbal memory, verbal fluency, and perceived changes in these cognitive functions. The extent to which cognitive impairments interfere with daily functioning, whether other people observe cognitive impairments, and the impact of cognitive dysfunction on quality of life are also assessed. 32 4, 6, 8
Cognitive Function - Abilities Patient-perceived functional abilities with regard to cognitive tasks, including the perception that one’s cognitive ability with regard to the domain of inquiry (e.g.concentration, memory) has not changed. 31 4, 6, 8
Emotional Distress – Anger Angry mood (irritability, frustration), negative social cognitions (interpersonal sensitivity, envy, disagreeableness), and efforts to control anger. 22  5

Emotional Distress – Anxiety

PROMIS-Cancer – Anxiety

Fear (fearfulness, panic), anxious misery (worry, dread), hyperarousal (tension, nervousness, restlessness), and somatic symptoms related to arousal (racing heart,dizziness).

29
22

4, 6, 7, 8

Emotional Distress – Depression

PROMIS-Cancer – Depression

Negative mood (sadness, guilt), views of self (self- criticism,worthlessness), and social cognition (loneliness, interpersonal alienation), as well as decreased positive affect and engagement (loss of interest, meaning, and purpose).

28
30

4, 6, 8a, 8b
General Life Satisfaction One’s cognitive evaluation of life experiences and whether one likes his/her life or not. 10 5
Meaning and Purpose A sense that life has purpose and there are good reasons for living, including hopefulness, optimism, goal-directedness, and feelings that one’s life is worthy. 37 4, 6, 8
Positive Affect Feelings that reflect a level of pleasurable engagement with the environment, such as happiness, joy, excitement, enthusiasm, and contentment. 34 15
Psychosocial Illness Impact – Negative Direct negative psychosocial effect of cancer, distinct from general emotional distress. 32 4, 8
Psychosocial Illness Impact – Positive Positive psychosocial (emotional and social) outcomes of illness, previously conceptualized in various ways including post-traumatic growth, benefit-finding, and meaning making. 39 4, 8
Self-Efficacy - General Confidence in ability to successfully perform specific tasks or behaviors related to one's health in a variety of situations.  10  4
Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Conditions – Manage Daily Activities Confidence in performing various activities of daily living (ADLs) without assistance. Items also assess exercise, sexual activities and managing activities in challenging situations (travelling, bad weather). 35 4, 8
Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Conditions – Manage Emotions Confidence to manage/control symptoms of anxiety, depression, helplessness, discouragement, frustration, disappointment and anger. 25 4, 8
Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Conditions – Manage Meds/Treatment Confidence in managing medication schedules of different complexity. Managing medication and other treatments in challenging situations such as when travelling, when running out of medication, and when adverse effects are encountered. 26 4, 8
Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Conditions – Manage Social Interactions Confidence in participating in social activities and getting help when necessary. Managing communication with others about their medical condition, including communication with health professionals. 23 4, 8
Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Conditions – Manage Symptoms Confidence to manage/control their symptoms, to manage their symptoms in different settings and to keep symptoms from interfering with work, sleep, relationships or recreational activities. 28 4, 8

Smoking – Coping Expectancies

All Smokers; Daily Smokers; Nondaily Smokers

Using smoking as a way to cope with various types of negative affect, affective consequences of not smoking, and the extent to which negative affect triggers smoking. 11; 15; 18 4; 4; 4

Smoking – Emotional/Sensory Expectancies

All Smokers; Daily Smokers; Nondaily Smokers

Improved cognitive abilities (e.g., concentration), positive affective states (e.g., relaxation, contentment), and enjoyable sensorimotor sensations (e.g., from the ritual of lighting up a cigarette, smelling the cigarette, inhaling the smoke) that are experienced as a result of smoking.  15; 16; 17 6; 6; 6

Smoking – Negative Health Expectancies

All Smokers; Daily Smokers; Nondaily Smokers

Health-related outcome expectancies of smoking (e.g., Smoking gives me a headache) and quitting (e.g., if I quit smoking I will breathe easier), and emotions such as worry (e.g., about developing serious health problems in the future). 12; 19; 18 6; 6; 6

Smoking – Negative Psychosocial Expectancies

All Smokers; Daily Smokers; Nondaily Smokers

Friend and family disapproval (e.g., if I quit smoking my friends will respect me more), self-disapproval (e.g., I get upset when I think about my smoking), and internalization of social norms (e.g., I feel uncomfortable smoking around kids). 14; 20; 15 6; 6; 6

Smoking – Nicotine Dependence

All Smokers; Daily Smokers; Nondaily Smokers

Tolerance, craving, withdrawal severity, temptations to smoke, and smoking as a behavioral priority. 20; 27; 27 4,8; 4,8; 4,8

Smoking – Social Motivations

All Smokers; Daily Smokers; Nondaily Smokers

Beliefs that: (a) smoking makes social situations more comfortable or enjoyable; (b) smoking provides a sense of camaraderie and belonging; (c) quitting smoking can negatively impact existing relationships with smokers; and (d) being in certain social situations increases smoking or the temptation to smoke. 7; 12; 12 4; 4; 4

Substance Use - Appeal

Past 30 Days; Past 3 months

Perceived positive aspects of substance use, including both increasing positive emotions (e.g., feeling happy and social) and alleviating negative emotions (e.g., reducing depression and anxiety).  Requires a screening question to document the presence of some use: “In the past 30 days, have you used drugs other than alcohol or your prescribed medications?” 18; 18 7; 7

Substance Use - Prescription Pain Medication Misuse

Abuse of prescription pain medication.  Requires a screening question to document the presence of a prescription for use: “In the past 3 months, did you have a prescription for pain medication?” 22 7

Substance Use - Severity

Past 30 Days; Past 3 months

Severity of substance use in adults. Requires a screening question to document the presence of some use: “In the past 3 months, have you used drugs other than alcohol or your prescribed medications?” 37; 37 7; 7
Physical Health
Dyspnea – Activity Motivation** An adult’s relative dispositional tendency or preference toward being active or sedentary. 8  
Dyspnea – Activity Requirements** Impact of an adult's environment on their physical activity levels and external activity demands on an adult, such as work outside the home and aspects of the home environment (e.g., stairs). 4  
Dyspnea – Airborne Exposure** Environmental factors related to dyspnea, including exposure to airborne allergens, pollutants and smoke, and whether or not an adult is exposed to airborne factors in their environment that could impact their shortness of breath. 6  
Dyspnea – Assistive Devices** Availability and use of assistive devices (e.g., cane, grab bar, or oxygen) and whether or not an individual uses such devices. 7  
Dyspnea – Characteristics** Various descriptive aspects of a person’s experience of dyspnea, including quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the severity and intensity of shortness of breath as well as its frequency and duration. 5  
Dyspnea – Emotional Response** Emotions experienced related to dyspnea, including embarrassment, fear and worry, and how individuals may react emotionally to their shortness of breath. 8  
Dyspnea – Functional Limitations Impact of dyspnea (i.e. shortness of breath or difficulty breathing) on an adult’s ability to function while performing specific daily activities (e.g., dressing oneself without help, preparing meals, walking up 20 stairs). 33 10
Dyspnea – Task Avoidance** An adult's decision to stop engaging in certain activities when the breathing discomfort associated with continuing the activity can no longer be tolerated.  4  
Dyspnea – Time Extension** Whether there has been a meaningful increase or decrease in the duration of time needed by an adult to perform a given task in the past 7 days (compared to 3 months ago) due to shortness of breath.  8  
Dyspnea – Severity Severity of shortness of breath or difficulty breathing an adult experiences in response to various specific activities (the same activities assessed in Dyspnea Functional Limitations). 33 10

Fatigue

PROMIS-Cancer – Fatigue

Range of symptoms, from mild subjective feelings of tiredness to an overwhelming, debilitating, and sustained sense of exhaustion that likely decreases one’s ability to execute daily activities and function normally in family or social roles.

95


54

4, 6, 7 (weekly), 7 (daily) 8, 13
Gastrointestinal – Belly Pain Severity of belly pain in adult populations . The intensity, nature (sharp vs. dull), frequency, bothersomeness, and predictability (e.g. ability to tell in advance when a pain episode would occur) all contribute towards belly pain severity. 5  
Gastrointestinal – Bowel Incontinence Frequency of bowel incontinence, soiling, and gas incontinence (i.e. stool leakage while passing gas)  4  
Gastrointestinal – Constipation Frequency and intensity of incomplete evacuation, rectal pain, straining, and hard stools, as well as the need for manual extraction of stool.  9  
Gastrointestinal – Diarrhea Frequency, form, bothersomeness, impact, controllability, and predictability of bowel urgency  6  
Gastrointestinal – Disrupted Swallowing Difficulty swallowing solid and soft foods, liquids, and pills as well as throat/chest pain and the sensation of food being stuck in the throat/chest.  7  
Gastrointestinal – Gas and Bloating Frequency and intensity/severity of bloating (i.e. feeling pressure or fullness), bloating appearance (i.e. belly swollen or larger than usual size), flatulence (i.e. passing gas), and abdominal sounds (i.e. gurgling or rumbling).  13  
Gastrointestinal – Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms associated with stomach contents leaking backwards from the stomach into the esophagus. 13  
Gastrointestinal – Nausea and Vomiting Frequency of vomiting, nausea, and poor appetite, as well as the predictability of nausea.  4  
Pain – Behavior Behaviors that typically indicate to others that an individual is experiencing pain. These actions or reactions can be verbal or nonverbal, and involuntary or deliberate. 39 7

Pain – Interference

PROMIS-Cancer – Pain Interference

Consequences of pain on relevant aspects of one’s life. This includes the extent to which pain hinders engagement with social, cognitive, emotional, physical, and recreational activities.

40

35

4, 6a, 6b, 8
Pain Intensity How much a person hurts 3  

Pain Quality – Neuropathic Pain 

Caused by damage to the peripheral somatosensory nervous system, part of the nervous system involved in bodily feelings.  This damage can be caused by an abnormality, trauma or disease. 5  
Pain Quality – Nociceptive Pain Caused by stimulation of peripheral nerve fibers (nociceptors) in the context of a normally functioning somatosensory nervous system. 5  

Physical Function

 

PROMIS-Cancer – Physical Function

Self-reported capability rather than actual performance of physical activities. This includes the functioning of one’s upper extremities (dexterity), lower extremities (walking or mobility), and central regions (neck, back), as well as instrumental activities of daily living, such as running errands.

165

 

45

4, 6, 8, 10a, 20

10b

     – Mobility Activities of physical mobility such as getting out of bed or a chair to activities such as running. 15  
     – Upper Extremity Activities that require use of the upper extremity including shoulder, arm, and hand activities. Examples include writing, using buttons, or opening containers. 46  7
Physical Function for Samples with Mobility Aid Users For samples that may include individuals who use mobility aids such as wheelchairs. 114 11
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Erectile Function Ability to achieve and maintain an erection for sexual activity. 8  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Global Satisfaction with Sex Life An overall evaluation of his or her sex life. No limitation is placed on what the person includes in his or her definition of “sex life.” 7  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Interest in Sexual Activity Conscious awareness of wanting to engage in sexual activity. 4  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Lubrication Wetness or dryness of the vagina during sexual activity. 8  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Vaginal Discomfort Physical discomfort of the vagina during and immediately following sexual activity. 10  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Anal Discomfort** Anal irritation, pain, or bleeding during or after anal sex 5  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Interfering Factors** Perception of the degree to which various factors affect satisfaction with sex life. These factors include symptoms of disease and side effects from treatment and other issues that have been identified by participants. 10  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Orgasm** The degree to which the person has experienced a satisfying climax. 3  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Orgasm Pleasure (v2.0) How pleasurable or satisfying the person's orgasms have felt.  3  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Therapeutic Aids** Use of hormones, personal lubrications, medications, or devices intended to allow for or improve sexual function. 9  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Sexual Activities** Frequency of engaging in specific intimate or sexual behaviors, either alone or with a partner. 12  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction Screener Questions** Asks about sex (gender), whether people are in a relationship that could involve sexual activity, and whether they have had any type of sexual activity with a partner in the past 30 days. 3  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Oral Discomfort with Sexual Activity (v2.0) The degree of physical discomfort in the mouth, including pain and/or irritation, experienced with sexual activity  6  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Oral Dryness with Sexual Activity (v2.0) The lack of saliva in the mouth experienced with sexual activity  3  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Bother Regarding Sexual Function (v2.0) The extent to which people were bothered by aspects of sexual functioning 11   
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Vulvar Discomfort with Sexual Activity – Clitoral (v2.0) The degree of physical discomfort, including pain, of the clitoris experienced with sexual activity  4  
Sexual Function and Satisfaction: Vulvar Discomfort with Sexual Activity - Labial (v2.0) The degree of physical discomfort, including pain, of the labia experienced with sexual activity  
Sleep Disturbance Perceptions of sleep quality, sleep depth, and restoration associated with sleep. 27 4, 6, 8a, 8b
Sleep-Related Impairment Perceptions of alertness, sleepiness, and tiredness during usual waking hours, and the perceived functional impairments during wakefulness associated with sleep problems or impaired alertness. 16 8
Social Health
Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities Perceived ability to perform one’s usual social roles and activities. 35 4, 6, 8
Companionship Perceived availability of someone with whom to share enjoyable social activities such as visiting, talking, celebrations, etc. 6 4
Emotional Support Perceived feelings of being cared for and valued as a person; having confidant relationships. 16 4, 6, 8
Informational Support Perceived availability of helpful information or advice. 10 4, 6, 8
Instrumental Support Perceived availability of assistance with material, cognitive or task performance. 11 4, 6, 8
Satisfaction with Participation in Discretionary Social Activities (v1.0) Contentment with leisure interests and relationships with friends. 12 7
Satisfaction with Participation in Social Roles (v1.0) Satisfaction with performing one’s usual social roles and activities 14 4, 6, 7, 8
Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities (v2.0) Satisfaction with performing one’s usual social roles and activities (e.g., “I am satisfied with my ability to participate in family activities”). 44 4, 6, 8
Social Isolation Perceptions of being avoided, excluded, detached, disconnected from, or unknown by, others. 14 4, 6, 8
Profiles      
PROMIS-29 Profile (v2.0) A collection of 4-item short forms assessing anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain interference, physical function, sleep disturbance, and ability to participate in social roles and activities as well as a single pain intensity item.   29
PROMIS-43 Profile (v2.0) A collection of 6-item short forms assessing anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain interference, physical function, sleep disturbance, and ability to participate in social roles and activities as well as a single pain intensity item.   43
PROMIS-57 Profile (v2.0) A collection of 8-item short forms assessing anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain interference, physical function, sleep disturbance, and ability to participate in social roles and activities as well as a single pain intensity item.   57
PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction Profile – Female (v1.0) A collection of brief (1-3) item short forms assessing interest in sexual activity, orgasm, global satisfaction with sex life, lubrication, and vaginal discomfort.   11
PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction Profile – Male (v1.0) A collection of brief (1-3) item short forms assessing interest in sexual activity, orgasm, global satisfaction with sex life, and erectile function.   8
PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction Profile (v1.0) A collection of brief (1-3) item short forms assessing interest in sexual activity, orgasm, global satisfaction with sex life, lubrication, vaginal discomfort, and erectile function. Items are skipped if they are not applicable for the respondent’s gender.   8 or 11

Last updated April, 2017

*Global Health is scored into physical and mental health summary scores.
**uncalibrated item pool

Translations

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Types of Measures

PROMIS measures include item banks, short forms, or computer adaptive tests (CATs). Scales are collections of scored items to be administered in their entirety. Profiles measure multiple concepts through a fixed collection of short forms. Pools are collections of related items not intended to produce a summary score, but to be used as single items.

Retired Measures

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